Lab 7 Chromosomes Lab

Lab 7 Chromosomes Lab
Instructions
All work needs to be your own. This is the most important instruction. Evidence this work is not your own can lead to a zero and a report to the Dean of Students for academic dishonesty. It is not worth it. Your answers do not have to be perfect to earn an excellent grade. If you are having trouble, tell me before the deadline. It is my job to help you work through this material.
Put your answers in bold or highlight.
To help you find the questions you need to answer, those questions begin with red highlight.
Information from this lab will be tested on Exam 3 Life’s Information.

Part 1 of 3: Eukaryotic Cell Mitosis
Go to this website http://www.biology.arizona.edu/cell_bio/activities/cell_cycle/cell_cycle.html

Answer the following questions as you work your way through the lab.
Why look at onion root tips when studying mitosis?
How are the root cells visualized?
What divisions are arbitrary and why?
Click Next.
What is the cell doing during interphase?
Describe in words what the cell looks like during interphase.
What FOUR things happen during prophase?
Where do the chromosomes go during metaphase?
Why is this location of chromosomes (during metaphase) important?
What happens to the chromosomes during anaphase?
How are the chromosomes moved during anaphase?
What are the TWO things that definitely occur during telophase?
Click Next.
What will the time a dividing cell spends in each phase be based on?
Complete the table below once you have identified the 36 cells you will be shown.
Interphase Prophase Metaphase Anaphase Telophase Total
Number of cells
36

Percent of Cells
100%

What percentage of cells were in interphase? Interphase is when the cell is not dividing, while prophase, metaphase, anaphase and telophase are all part of mitosis.
What percentage of cells were in mitosis (prophase + metaphase + anaphase + telophase)?
Given your answers to the above questions, were more cells dividing (mitosis) or not dividing (interphase)?
Which phase of mitosis (prophase, metaphase, anaphase or telophase) had the most cells?
Why do you think this phase of mitosis takes the longest? (What is happening?)
Part 2 of 3: Eukaryotic Cell Chromosomes

Table 1: Complete the boxes that have an asterisk.* Indicating whether the species is a plant or animal and the number of chromosomes in a haploid or diploid cell. You could help me by highlighting your answers or putting them in bold.

Organism Plant or Animal Haploid Number Diploid Number
Mosquito (Aedes aegypti) Animal 3 6
Broccoli, cabbage, kale, kohlrabi, brussel sprouts, and cauliflower are all the same species (Brassica oleracea) * 9 *
Coffee (Coffea arabica) * * 44
Human (Homo sapiens) * * *
Pineapple (Ananas comosus) * 25 *
Strawberry (Fragaria bucharica) * 28 *
Wooly Mammoth (DNA extracted from 10,000 year old carcass) (Mammuthus primigenius) * * 58
Donkey (Equus africanus) * * 62
Mule (Mules are the offspring of a horse and a donkey. They have no scientific name because they cannot reproduce) * No meiosis/
sterile 63
Horse (Equus ferus) * * 64
Dog (Canis lupus) * * 78
Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) * * 78
Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) * 40 *
Fern (Botrypus virginianus) * * 184

Table 2: Match the eukaryote species described below to the extreme chromosome number in Table 2.
Atlas Blue Butterfly – the male butterflies are fluorescent blue, they live in North Africa (Polyommatus atlantica)
Muntjac – a deer species that lives in southeast Asia (Muntiacus muntjack)
Ciliated protozoan – they live anywhere there is water from lakes to oceans (Oxytricha trifallax)
Red visacha rat – a small rat species that lives in Argentina (Tympanoctomys barrerae)

Species with this chromosome number Chromosome Number
6=Smallest known chromosome number in a mammal (Hint: the larger of the two mammals in list above)
102=Largest known
chromosome number in a mammal (Hint: the smaller of the two mammals in list above)
452=Largest known chromosome number in a multicellular eukaryote (not a mammal)
29,000,000=Largest known chromosome number in a eukaryote (some of the chromosomes are so small they contain a single gene)

Table 1 and 2 Analysis
Describe one thing you learned about animal chromosome numbers in Table 1.
Describe one thing you learned about plant chromosome numbers in Table 1.
Describe one thing that surprised you about animal and/or plant chromosome numbers in Table 1.
Describe one thing that surprised you about the chromosome numbers in Table 2.
What is one question you now have regarding chromosomes in eukaryotic cells?

Part 3 of 3: Eukaryotic Cell Karyotypes
Go to this website http://www.biology.arizona.edu/human_bio/activities/karyotyping/karyotyping.html

Answer the following questions as you work your way through the lab.
When do chromosomes condense and become visible by a light microscope?
The chromosomes are stained which make areas rich in ______________ form dark bands.
What will this karyotyping technique allow us to look for?
Click ‘Patient Histories.’
Click ‘Complete Patient A’s Karyotype’
Click the single chromosome in the “karyotype” that is its best match for the chromosome shown on the top left.
What notation would you use to characterize Patient A’s karyotype?
What diagnosis would give patient A?
Click ‘Patient B’
Click the single chromosome in the “karyotype” that is its best match for the chromosome shown on the top left. (HINT: DON’T FORGET ABOUT THE X AND Y CHROMOSOME)
What notation would you use to characterize Patient B’s karyotype?
What diagnosis would give patient B?
Click ‘Patient C’
Click the single chromosome in the “karyotype” that is its best match for the chromosome shown on the top left.
What notation would you use to characterize Patient C’s karyotype?
What diagnosis would give patient C?

 
"Looking for a Similar Assignment? Get Expert Help at an Amazing Discount!"
Looking for a Similar Assignment? Our Experts can help. Use the coupon code SAVE30 to get your first order at 30% off!